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Longshan Temple

Appropriately, we then went to spectacularly opulent Longshan Temple to see people engaging in games of chance to tell their fortunes. 

 

 

I’m interested in the complexities of this. How can someone believe that the future is already determined and yet believe that they can do something about it by knowing what it will be?  If they can do nothing why go to the trouble of finding out?  If they can do something about it then it is obviously not yet determined and therefore unknowable.  I’ve discussed this at length elsewhere on this website.

The day ended back at our hotel but not before we had some dinner at the night markets - Not quite Wendy paradise but heading in that direction.

 


Two of our party across the road - not inconspicuous - Clint's photo

 

Both at lunch and in the night markets we were something of a novelty.  There are few Europeans about.   But the people were universally friendly and didn’t mind at all big white people sitting in their little restaurants gobbling down their delicacies.  Smiles all round.

The Hotel was fine, if a little out of the way and we could walk a few hundred yards past car parts places and other semi-industrial businesses, to the local 7Eleven to buy some wine, coffee and real milk.  I considered buying a bike racing-suite and helmet, like the ‘Stig’ in Top Gear, from a shop that also had a Porsche parked inside, but decided that it would be ostentatious on the Number 30 bus from Mosman.

Rather strangely in this land of electronics, the Wi-Fi in the hotel was terrible and I was unable to send a simple e-mail.

The following day we arose early, prepared for a long drive South to the centre of the island. We were fully refreshed by the comfortable bed and fine shower and ample towels but I was disappointed by a breakfast making no concessions to European traditions.  I foolishly tried the cornflakes only to find them, like all the cereal, coated in sugar – inedible.  OK, congee and stir-fry it had to be.  

 

 

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