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The National Electricity Market

 

All states except Western Australia and the Northern Territory are connected to the eastern grid and electricity can flow forwards and backwards across state boundaries according to demand and supply.  This pool of suppliers, thus created, forms the National Electricity Market (NEM).  This functions as a central dispatch system and is managed by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO).

The NEM is a wholesale market through which generators and retailers trade electricity. There are six participating jurisdictions (five states and the ACT) linked by transmission network inter-connectors.

The electricity price in this market place is governed by demand and supply within wide limits.

Based on the generator’s offers to supply and the prevailing demand AEMO’s systems determine the generators required to produce electricity based on the principle of meeting the retailers’ demand in the most cost-efficient way. AEMO then dispatches these generators into production.

The dispatch price between the market and generators is struck every five minutes and averaged to the NEM spot price every half hour for each of five generation regions. This price fluctuates very substantially according to season and time of day with additional variability due to sun, wind, or rain and even what’s on TV.

The Australian Energy Regulator monitors the market to ensure that participants comply with the National Electricity Law and the National Electricity Rules.  These rules set a maximum spot price of $12,500 per MWh.  The prevailing weekly spot price can be seen on the AEMO website.   At the time of writing this is averaging $66.52/MWh in NSW post carbon tax.  But this week there were fluctuations as low as $41 and as high as $290.

 

 

Electricity consumption

The industry often tells us about new initiatives in terms of how many households they can support.  But households consume less than a quarter of the electricity delivered in Australia.  Most of the increase in the cost of electricity is borne by industry and commerce.  In due course this cost ends up in our wallets in other ways.

  

Electricity consumption by sector 2009
  Final
Consumption
(GWh)
Residential Commercial
and Public
Services
Industry Transport Agriculture
Forestry & Other
Per Capita Consumption (MWh pa)
Australia                     213,773 22.7% 21.4% 36.0% 1.1% 0.7% 9.43
United   States                   3,642,203 32.3% 31.3% 18.9% 0.2% 3.5% 11.60
Germany                      495,573 24.0% 22.4% 34.8% 2.7% 1.5% 6.05
France                      423,440 33.0% 23.2% 22.4% 2.4% 1.0% 6.48
United   Kingdom                      322,417 32.4% 23.6% 25.9% 2.3% 1.0% 5.18
Spain                      255,368 24.3% 27.9% 33.0% 1.1% 3.0% 5.53
Sweden                      123,374 29.0% 18.9% 36.4% 1.7% 1.3% 12.99
Switzerland                        57,483 27.0% 26.1% 27.5% 4.6% 1.5% 7.23

 Source: IEA - International Energy Agency

Notes:  

  • Since 2009 several Australian aluminium smelters have closed or reduced production.  The proportion or electricity consumed by industry will be less than it was then.
  • Final Consumption is electricity delivered to the home market after imports and exports, losses and the electricity industry's own use have been deducted.
    Australian losses are amongst the highest in the world due to our long transmission distances and our use of pump-storage for load smoothing.

 

 

 


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Travel

Burma (Myanmar)

 

 

This is a fascinating country in all sorts of ways and seems to be most popular with European and Japanese tourists, some Australians of course, but they are everywhere.

Since childhood Burma has been a romantic and exotic place for me.  It was impossible to grow up in the Australia of the 1950’s and not be familiar with that great Australian bass-baritone Peter Dawson’s rendition of Rudyard Kipling’s 'On the Road to Mandalay' recorded two decades or so earlier:  

Come you back to Mandalay
Where the old flotilla lay
Can't you hear their paddles chunking
From Rangoon to Mandalay

On the road to Mandalay
Where the flying fishes play
And the Dawn comes up like thunder
out of China 'cross the bay

The song went Worldwide in 1958 when Frank Sinatra covered it with a jazz orchestration, and ‘a Burma girl’ got changed to ‘a Burma broad’; ‘a man’ to ‘a cat’; and ‘temple bells’ to ‘crazy bells’.  

Read more ...

Fiction, Recollections & News

Reminiscing about the 50’s

 

 

Elsewhere on this site, in the article Cars, Radios, TV and other Pastimes,   I've talked about aspects of my childhood in semi-rural Thornleigh on the outskirts of Sydney, Australia. I've mentioned various aspects of school and things we did as kids.

A great many things have changed.  I’ve already described how the population grew exponentially. Motor vehicles finally replaced the horse in everyday life.  We moved from imperial measurements and currency to decimal currency and metric measures.  The nation gained its self-confidence particularly in the arts and culture.  I’ve talked about the later war in Vietnam and Australia embracing of Asia in place of Europe.

Here are some more reminiscences about that world that has gone forever.

Read more ...

Opinions and Philosophy

The Fukushima Nuclear Crisis

 

 

Japan has 55 nuclear reactors at 19 sites.  Two more are under construction and another twelve are in the advanced planning stage.  Net Generating capacity is around 50 GW providing around 30% of the country's electricity (more here).  

As a result of Japan’s largest earthquake in history on March 11 and subsequent tsunami all reactors shut down automatically as they were designed to do but cooling systems associated with two sites had been damaged. 

Three reactor sites are adjacent to the earthquake epicentre and two were in the direct path of the tsunami.  The Fukushima-Daiichi plant belonging to Tokyo Electric Power Company was particularly hard hit.  It lost all grid connections, providing electricity, and its backup power plant was seriously damaged. 

Read more ...

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