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Food

I’ve mentioned that on several occasions we were taken to streets where there were local food vendors or small restaurants and set loose to find our own food of choice.  But on others we were taken to larger establishments where the meal was part of our tour.  At several of these restaurants some dozen or more local dishes were presented as a banquet to be shared.

The Taiwanese are very proud of their food and believe it to be the best in the world.  

I’m on record elsewhere as saying that I don’t like spicy food. But Wendy and Craig do with Sonia on the fence.  Others in our party were mixed as to taste preference. 

 

 

But no one took to a special green soup that appeared several times as a delicacy.  Having said that, most other dishes quickly disappeared into the collective digestive system, some with more enthusiastic praise than others. 

I certainly didn’t starve but on the whole those of us who had been to China agreed that the food on the mainland, particularly in Beijing, is better.

By the end of the trip I was glad to get to Hong Kong and then to China to eat something less monotonously 'Taiwanese'.

Anyway, the local wine and beer was good and wine and beer from elsewhere was inexpensive too.

 

 

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