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Kaosiung City

That evening we reached Kaosiung City the second largest city in Taiwan. It’s much more industrial and down-to earth than Taipei.  There is a pleasant riverside walk with coffee shops along the Love River that provided a relaxing respite from constant travel.

 

 

By now we were becoming acclimatised, so being set loose to find our own food for dinner in the night markets was fine.  We found a dumpling place adjacent to the local park and watched the locals go about their evening wanderings. 

The following morning it was up again early to set out for the southernmost tip of the island where there is, obviously, a lighthouse.  On the way, to my distress, we failed to go past the heavy engineering of the City such as the steelworks and shipbuilding and passed one of the nuclear power stations at high speed.

 


One of Taiwan's nuclear powerstations - the two brown containment vessles to the right

 

 

 

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