*take nothing for granted!
Unless otherwise indicated all photos © Richard McKie 2005 - 2015

Who is Online

We have 211 guests and no members online

Translate to another language

Bucharest (București)

Bucharest is a fine old city in decay, like an aging courtesan.  For me Bucharest is best represented by its trams. These are great grey thundering monsters that clank heavily and slowly down the streets with no apparent suspension, unlike modern trams elsewhere that glide almost silently along.  They are fundamentally shabby yet practical and somehow confident, in a tank-like way, as they force their passage through the unruly traffic.

The hotel we stayed in in Bucharest was once a mansion and has been scrupulously restored to its former glory.  It is not an insignificant establishment.  But alarmingly the taxi driver bringing us from the airport could not find it on his GPS.  When I looked at Google Street View the reason became evident.  In July 2014, when the images were captured, the Grand Boutique Hotel was still a construction site, like the similarly grand building on the corner of Strada Negustori that is now undergoing renovation.

 

Grand Boutique Hotel Grand Boutique Hotel
Bucharest Bucharest
Grand Boutique Hotel Grand Boutique Hotel
Grand Boutique Hotel - part of our room and a fraction of our bathroom; one of the bars and reception

 

 

Thus Bucharest, with a population of just 1.9 million that feels bigger because of its grand old semi-vacant buildings, is slowly recovering some of its former glory.  But it's off a low base - there's a long way to go. 

 

Bucharest Bucharest
Bucharest Bucharest
Bucharest Bucharest
Bucharest Streets

 

In Ceaușescu's time a large part of the old city was demolished to build a grand boulevard, headed by the vast Parliament building and lined with matching office blocks.  The Palace of the Parliament is the second largest administrative building in the world after the Pentagon and the fourth largest building of any kind.  We got to see it on our second visit as foreign visitors have to surrender their passport and be accompanied at all times but we had left them in the hotel first time around.  We didn't get to visit all eleven hundred rooms nor even either of the two parliamentary chambers but we did see several of the vast halls part of the rooftop and even a cellar.  Photographs were prohibited inside.

 

View from the Palace of the Parliament
Ceaușescu's grand boulevard from the Palace of the Parliament balcony

 

To achieve this he knocked down a good deal of he oldest part of the city which leaves a picturesque remainder that has become a walking shopping/dining precinct.  It's adjacent to the university and museums and is quite bohemian with several conspicuous brothels.  Local people there, or were some tourists, looked well dressed and prosperous as they promenaded past the Irish Pub or café we happened to be eating or drinking at.  

 

Irish Pub
One of several Irish Pubs in the Old City

 

At the National Museum of Romanian History the principal reference to recent history is the trappings of monarchy, the crown jewels and so on.  The Roman occupation also receives a good deal of attention, particularly the time of Trajan whose column is reproduced in plaster.  I was a bit bemused as to what it's doing here. It's very lonely as the only exhibit of this genre.  The plaster replicas of this column in Rome item occupy most of the building - a collection of one. It's not unique there is similar plaster copy, among thousands of exhibits, in the V&A in London and of course the one in Rome, so I suppose this has been singled out to benefit Romanian scholars of Roman history. A controversial post-modern bronze statue of Trajan stands on the steps outside and passers-by keep his penis bright with frequent fondling.

 

Trajan
Trajan on the steps

 

In addition to trams and trolleybuses, Bucharest also boasts a metro dating from the Ceaușescu era, with four lines and 51 stations.  More are planned. 

There is a lot to see around Bucharest from Roman ruins to various churches and museums.

 

Bucharest Bucharest
Bucharest Bucharest
Some other places of interest around Bucharest
Roman ruins; a 'Capitoline Wolf' statue, with Romulus and Remus, beneath her; and two Romanian Orthodox churches
The Wolf is one of five copies of the Roman original given to Romania by Italy in 1921
She represents the new unity of Romanians and their 'Latinity'
 

 

We didn't use the public transport but walked to the nearby old-city or used cabs further afield.  This was a lesson in itself, as the cab drivers are skilled at exploiting tourists with two quite different fee scales and are best hired by the concierge at one's hotel.  As mentioned above we also hired a car and I had the fun of driving in and out of the city.

Using the car we headed to Brașov 270km to the north, enjoying the motorway that extends for a good part of the way.

Near Brașov we saw the first of Transylvania's many fortified Saxon towns and churches. In the twelfth century the Kings of Hungary settled German colonists in the area against the expansion of the Ottomans and Tartars (Turkic Muslims).  From the 13th to 16th centuries there around 300 such Christian fortifications were constructed against these 'heathen hordes' that had overrun much of what today is modern Romania.  There remain 130, once Saxon, towns and villages in the Transylvania region each with a fortified church.

Obviously the fortified churches were originally Roman Catholic but with the Protestant Reformation they seemingly universally saw the error of their theological ways and adopted Lutheran theology.  They remain so today.   Their congregations have dwindled over the ages and now a small minority adhere to the Lutheran religion while the great majority of modern Romanians now follow the Eastern (Romanian Orthodox) Rite.  Nevertheless the Saxon churches are significant points of interest on the tourist agenda and a number have world heritage listing. 

They are also fascinating reminders of the mega-litres of blood that have been shed in the name of conflicting human imaginative conceptions of the divine.

 

 

Add comment


Security code
Refresh


    Have you read this???     -  this content changes with each opening of a menu item


Travel

Peru

 

 

In October 2011 our little group: Sonia, Craig, Wendy and Richard visited Peru. We flew into Lima from Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. After a night in Lima we flew to Iquitos.

Read more ...

Fiction, Recollections & News

Merry Christmas

 

 

 

As Tim Minchin sings in White Wine in the Sun [turn on your sound...] Christmas is a time for family.  This year our family is one bigger.  I have a new grandchild, Tilda Charlotte, in Germany.  So the lyrics:

And if my baby girl
When you're twenty-one or thirty-one
And Christmas comes around
And you find yourself nine thousand miles from home
You'll know what ever comes
Your brothers and sisters and me and your mum
Will be waiting for you in the sun
When Christmas comes
Your brothers and sisters, your aunts and your uncles
Your grandparents, cousins and me and your mum
We'll be waiting for you in the sun
Drinking white wine in the sun Darling, whenever you come
We'll be waiting for you in the sun
Drinking white wine in the sun
Waiting for you in the sun Darling, when Christmas comes
We'll be waiting for you in the sun
Waiting
  

have a special meaning this year:  I really like Christmas - It's sentimental, I know.

Read more ...

Opinions and Philosophy

Holden - The Demise of an Iconic Brand

 

 

I drive a Holden Commodore.  It’s a nice shiny black one.  A Lumina edition.

I have owned well over a dozen cars and driven a lot more, in numerous countries, but this is my first Holden.

I’m starting to think that I can put an end to any car brand, just by buying one.

Holden is to cease manufacturing in 2017.

Read more ...

Terms of Use                                           Copyright