*take nothing for granted!
Unless otherwise indicated all photos © Richard McKie 2005 - 2015

Who is Online

We have 309 guests and no members online

Translate to another language

 

The calm before the storm

Thus, for several years, everyone went on with their lives, happily jumping from bed to bed, until Christine, probably looking for something a bit more exciting, took up with two West Indians: a jazz piano player Aloysius "Lucky" Gordon; and Johnny Edgecombe a jealous criminal associate of Peter Rachman.  The two had already been in a knife fight over her and while she was hiding-out from Johnny, with Mandy at Stephen Ward’s muse cottage pied-à-terre, five shots were fired into the building and the police were called.  

Both West Indians were charged with assorted offences.  As their trials began details of Stephen Ward’s lifestyle started to become public.  This was juicy stuff and The Screws (News) of the World interviewed Christine and offered financial inducements to tell all.  Injunctions and threats of actions for defamation flew. The paparazzi went into overdrive.  Photographs of people variously smiling into the cameras or scurrying away under coats and newspapers blossomed in the media.  In the midst of this excitement Christine stepped it up a notch by briefly fleeing the country to France, providing a story that could be published.

Christine was the principal prosecution witness against Lucky Gordon. She was found to be lying and confessed.  Convicted of perjury she served a nine month jail term. 

Profumo had been named as an ex-lover.  First he denied everything.  Then he admitted being there but not doing anything.  Then finally he admitted having the affair but not of telling her anything of a secret nature.  But at the outset he had made a false statement to the House.  He was obliged to resign from Parliament and went on to be on his best behaviour elsewhere as a pillar of the establishment until his death.  Dozens of books, documentaries, films and dramatisations followed.  Whenever there is a resurgence in interest in the scandal, poor John and his exemplary family are invariably depicted as the victims of ongoing media harassment and distress. 

Many have suggested that his demise was harsh considering that Bill Clinton effectively got away with the same lie.

Unfortunately for John Profumo he told his lies in Parliament where there are very strict rules surrounding being caught.  

On the other hand maybe his was the better deal.  I can’t imagine any schoolboy pinning-up a photo of Monica Lewinsky sitting naked on a chair.

 

 

 image002
The famous Chair

 

My favourite schoolboy joke:

Q: Why is Christine Keeler like a (Stephen) Ward-robe?

A: Because you pull out her draws and the cabinet falls apart.

 

Add comment


Security code
Refresh


    Have you read this???     -  this content changes with each opening of a menu item


Travel

China

 

 

I first visited China in November 1986.  I was representing the New South Wales Government on a multinational mission to our Sister State Guangdong.  My photo taken for the trip is still in the State archive [click here].  The theme was regional and small business development.  The group heard presentations from Chinese bureaucrats and visited a number of factories in rural and industrial areas in Southern China.  It was clear then that China was developing at a very fast rate economically. 

Read more ...

Fiction, Recollections & News

Egyptian Mummies

 

 

 

 

Next to Dinosaurs mummies are the museum objects most fascinating to children of all ages. 

At the British Museum in London crowds squeeze between show cases to see them.  At the Egyptian Museum in Cairo they are, or were when we visited in October 2010 just prior to the Arab Spring, by far the most popular exhibits (follow this link to see my travel notes). Almost every large natural history museum in the world has one or two mummies; or at the very least a sarcophagus in which one was once entombed.

In the 19th century there was something of a 'mummy rush' in Egypt.  Wealthy young European men on their Grand Tour, ostensibly discovering the roots of Western Civilisation, became fascinated by all things 'Oriental'.  They would pay an Egyptian fortune for a mummy or sarcophagus.  The mummy trade quickly became a lucrative commercial opportunity for enterprising Egyptian grave-robbers.  

Read more ...

Opinions and Philosophy

Energy and a ‘good life’

 

 

 

Energy

With the invention of the first practical steam engines at the turn of the seventeenth century, and mechanical energy’s increasing utility to replace the physical labour of humans and animals, human civilisation took a new turn.  

Now when a contemporary human catches public transport to work; drives the car to socialise with friends or family; washes and dries their clothes or the dishes; cooks their food; mows their lawn; uses a power tool; phones a friend or associate; or makes almost anything;  they use power once provided by slaves, servants or animals.

Read more ...

Terms of Use                                           Copyright