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In my paper Love in the time of Coronavirus I suggested that an option for managing Covid-19 was to sequester the vulnerable in isolation and allow the remainder of the population to achieve 'Natural Herd Immunity'.

Both the UK and Sweden announced that this was the strategy they preferred although the UK was soon equivocal.

The other option I suggested was isolation and accepting the economic and social costs involved until a vaccine is available to confer 'Herd Immunity'.

New Zealand, South Korea, Taiwan and, with reservations, Australia opted for that course - along with several other countries, including China.

In the event, every country in which the virus has taken hold has been obliged to implement some degree of social distancing to manage the number of deaths and has thus suffered the corresponding economic costs of jobs lost or suspended; rents unpaid; incomes lost; and as yet unquantified psychological injury.

 

Those countries that failed to act quickly to close their borders; quarantine travellers; and treat every case as a critical emergency (with full isolation and comprehensive contact tracing) now have so many infections that they are attempting to 'close the stable door after horse has bolted'.  It's too late to track down and isolate all those infected.

As with other viruses that plague humanity, the Covid-19 pandemic will continue until Herd Immunity is reached.

There are many viruses, already circulating at low levels, for which 'Natural Herd Immunity' has already been achieved. Some, like the four corona viruses responsible for the common cold, are relatively benign or asymptomatic and are already endemic in most human populations.

Nastier, very infectious viruses like measles; mumps; herpes; polio and so on have been brought under control by vaccines.  It was no longer necessary for people to catch many of these for the community to gain Herd Immunity after safe, effective, vaccines were developed and distributed to sufficient people.

A vaccine for Covid-19 is under development and should achieve a similar outcome - hopefully some time in the next two years.

In the absence of a vaccine, many countries are now heading down the Natural Herd Immunity path. 

Take, for example, Spain, the country that, at the time of writing, in early June 2020, has the highest number of deaths per million people. Spain has a population of 47 million with 27,940 deaths. Spain has 239,638 reported cases of Covid-19, resulting in an apparent case fatality rate (CFR) of close to 12%

While different populations have differing levels of overall health and life expectancy and pre-existing conditions are the biggest factor influencing Covid-19 mortality it's  improbable that the actual CFR in Spain is anywhere near this level.  Where there has been universal testing of a contained population, as on cruise ships, the CFR has been less than 1% and in Australia where testing is widespread and new cases  are below 10 per day the CFR is 1.43%. 

For a period Spain's health system was overwhelmed but even in countries where case numbers were manageable patients sick enough to be put on a ventilator frequently died so that's unlikely to be the reason for the extraordinary CFR.

So the very high reported CFR in Spain is most probably due to insufficient testing and unnoticed or unreported cases and its unlikely that Spain has a real CFR much above 2%.

Why is this important?

Because it means that Spain has had many more cases than they know about and many more unnoticed or unreported cases still circulating than they have detected.  As at June1 Spain is still suffering around 2000 deaths a week. Thus even if the real CFR is say 2% (50 cases per death) Spain may have as many as a hundred thousand, presently infected, people wandering around feeling slightly ill or totally oblivious.

At the moment, strict social distancing has the infection under control but if Spain returns to anything like the social and economic practices of last February with: crowded public transport, bars & clubs, sporting events and crowded public transport and those late night street parties, the virus will inevitably begin to multiply rapidly again.  In February and March 2020 Spain experienced ten doublings in less than a month, rapidly overwhelming the health system and exacerbating the death rate.  So a 'second wave' is a real possibility.

In the meantime the economic, social and psychological costs of such a long lockdown could well cost many lives due to other causes and condemn the, already struggling, economy to crippling debt and the Spanish people to terrible poverty for decades.

So one option is to open the economy again regardless. 

As several commentators have remarked, particularly in Sweden, slowing the rate is simply deferring the inevitable. And delaying these deaths needs to be balanced against the economic, social and psychological costs suffered by the healthy, in addition to the longer term debts to be made good by future generations. 

How bad could the death toll be? Most experts expect that the virus will be like others that are now endemic and will stabilise at a low background rate when Herd Immunity is reached, as did the 1918-19 Spanish Influenza.

There's a simple sum: Covid-19 seems to kill 1 to 2% of people who get it. To reach Herd Immunity most pundits say around 60% need to get it and survive (the Herd Immunity rate for measles is 90%; for flu about 60%). Thus, in the absence of a vaccine, Herd Immunity will not be reached until at six hundred thousand in a million have survived it. If this is achieved naturally, without a vaccine, the death rate will, correspondingly, reach somewhere between six and twelve thousand per million.

Yet, as we have seen above, the death rate in Spain is currently less than one tenth of this. So Spain is nowhere near Herd Immunity and without a vaccine this will not be achieved until around one in a hundred Spaniards have died. 

And here Spain's leaders, like those in many other countries in which the virus is only constrained by a lock-down, now face the unenviable choice between the Scylla and Charybdis that I referred to in Love in the time of Coronavirus.

 

 


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Travel

Malta

 

 

Almost everyone in Australia knows someone who hailed directly from Malta or is the child of Maltese parents. There are about a quarter as many Maltese Australians as there are Maltese Maltese so it is an interesting place to visit; where almost every cab driver or waiter announces that he or she has relatives in Sydney or Melbourne.

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Fiction, Recollections & News

Alan Turing and The Imitation Game

 

The movie The Imitation Game is an imaginative drama about the struggles of a gay man in an unsympathetic world. 

It's very touching and left everyone in the cinema we saw it in reaching for the tissues; and me feeling very guilty about my schoolboy homophobia. 

Benedict Cumberbatch, who we had previously seen as the modernised Sherlock Holmes, plays Alan Turing in much the same way that he played Sherlock Holmes.  And as in that series The Imitation Game differs in many ways from the original story while borrowing many of the same names and places.

Far from detracting from the drama and pathos these 'tweaks' to the actual history are the very grist of the new story.  The problem for me in this case is that the original story is not a fiction by Conan Doyle.  This 'updated' version misrepresents a man of considerable historical standing while simultaneously failing to accurately represent his considerable achievements.

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Opinions and Philosophy

Death

 

 

Death is one of the great themes of existence that interests almost everyone but about which many people avoid discussion.  It is also discussed in my essay to my children: The Meaning of Life on this website; written more than ten years ago; where I touch on personal issues not included below; such as risk taking and the option of suicide.

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